Author Topic: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0  (Read 1920 times)

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Offline Pattidevans

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7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« on: 02 October 2015, 08:37:45 PM »
I just saw this article written by Ginger Viera who is a long term T1.  It hit home with me because (without meaning to be in any way a show off, I have over 11 years managed an Hba1c under 7 (53 in new numbers) and her advice is along the lines I have always worked on for that time ( this ignores the first 18 months after diagnosis where I hadn't a clue).   I hope Ginger doesn't mind me reproducing her article here, but I felt it necessary to "translate" it for those of us who work in mmol/l.  See my numbers in bold after the US numbers given by Ginger.


Quote
Frustrated that you can’t get your A1C under 7.0 (53) even though others are able to? Managing type 1 or type 2 diabetes (or type 1.5) isn’t a straight-forward line. There’s no easy list of “1, 2, 3″ that you can do every day that will ever make diabetes management easy…but there are certain habits you can develop in your life that will have a huge impact on your blood sugar levels and your ability to reach your A1C goals.
Here are just a few habits of people with diabetes who successfully maintain A1Cs under 7.0.

 
 
 1. They count their carbohydrates
.

It’s very possible that your doctor told you take _x_ amount of insulin every time you eat but they never taught you the important of counting your carbohydrates. Rapid-acting insulin (Humalog, Novolog) is supposed to be taken based on the amount of carbohydrates you’re going to consume. Every individual has one or several “insulin to carbohydrate ratio” that determines how much insulin they should take based on what they’re eating. For example, a common carb-ratio for a type 1 diabetic is 1:15, meaning they need 1 unit of insulin for every 15 grams of carbohydrates they eat. Type 2 diabetes are generally more insulin resistant, so a common ratio might be 1:5, meaning they need 1 unit of insulin for every 5 grams of carbohydrate. To learn more about how to determine your own carb-ratio, check out the books Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner or Your Diabetes Science Experiment by Ginger Vieira (um, yeah, me!).

2. They check their blood sugar way more than 4 times a day.

Doctors will recommend checking your blood sugar 4 times a day…perhaps because that’s all that the insurance companies want to pay for or perhaps because they don’t think you’re capable of doing it more than that. The reality is that your blood sugar is changing constantly. And you won’t know when you’re high every day if you are only check your blood sugar before you eat and before you go to bed. Instead, checking your blood sugar the moment you wake up, before every meal, 1-2 hours after every meal, before bed, and around any exercise will give you the information you need to know if you’re getting enough or too much insulin at different times of the day! Ask your doctor to increase your prescription so you can get more test strips!

3. They look at the numbers and make changes!

If you’re checking your blood sugar every morning, and you’re seeing a 200 mg/dL (11 mmol/l) on your meter, that means you may be spending nearly 8 hours minimum of every day with blood sugars that will never lead to an A1C below 7.0 (53). If you want to get in the 6 (42)s range, then you’re going to study that 200 mg/dL (11mmol/l) by checking your blood sugar during the night, and looking at what you’re eating before bed, your insulin doses, etc. to figure out why you’re so high in the morning and what you need to do to get closer to 100 mg/dL (5.5). Look at your numbers and take action. If your numbers are constantly higher than the range of the A1C you’re aiming for, there’s no mystery: you need more insulin.

4. They eat mostly real, whole food.

Whether or not you choose to go low-carb or vegan or paleo isn’t going to make-or-break your A1C. What does matter is that what you’re eating is mostly whole, real food choices. That means that 80 to 90 percent of your day is real food–not processed stuff in packages–and that leaves a little room for a less-than-awesome snack. If you’re still telling yourself that it’s okay to hit up McDonald’s every morning for breakfast because you just “don’t have time” to make something healthy, then don’t be surprised if your blood sugars aren’t exactly cooperating either. Ditch the excuses and start exploring real, whole food! Stopping at McDonald’s actually takes way more time than spread almond butter on an apple, making a protein shake with unsweetened almond milk or even just eating a handful of nuts on your way out the door.

5. They exercise many times a week.

There’s no arguing: exercise helps reduce blood sugar levels in the moment but it also helps reduce blood levels overall. The more you exercise, the less work your body (and YOU) has to do (even the day after you exercise) to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range. The easiest exercise for the greatest impact? Walking! Get walking. Walking is awesome for burning fat. It doesn’t increase your appetite like running. You can walk before taking any fast-acting insulin to prevent major drops in your blood sugar. And it’s easy on your bones. Get walking. Get moving. Find a type of exercise you like and embrace it because it’s going to help your diabetes goals exponentially.

6. They believe they can.

Do you tell yourself that you “suck” at managing diabetes? What you tell yourself is what you’re going to believe. You will keep yourself stuck in that place for as long as you keep telling yourself that’s who you are. The people who achieve A1C percentages below 7.0 (53) are often encouraging themselves instead of discouraging themselves. They give themselves pats on the back for good choices and successful moments, and they don’t knock themselves down for making mistakes. If you’re stuck in a habit of putting yourself down, spend a week writing down every negative thought you have around your diabetes management and take a look at them. Those thoughts are with you all day long. Then, make a list of the person you want to be when it comes to your diabetes management and the kinds of thoughts that person has bubbling in their head all day long.

7. They never stop learning.

There are two options you have throughout your entire life with diabetes: constantly seek out new information around your diabetes and health in general…or decide that you just want to do keep doing exactly what you’re doing. The group that chooses the second option is going to get what they keep getting if they don’t seek out more knowledge around their diabetes and their health.
The first group is the kind of person who sees a high blood sugar after their run and relentlessly tries to figure out why it’s happening and what they can do to prevent it from happening again. They see a problem. They study it. They look for answers and solutions. And so on.
The other secret to learning is to “take what is useful and leave the rest.” If you read about an approach to nutrition that doesn’t really sound like a good fit for you, just take the parts you like and keep on studying nutrition until you develop an approach the feels right for you. The point is: never stop learning, and give yourself the opportunity to constantly evolve!
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Alan

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #1 on: 03 October 2015, 12:38:01 AM »
Pretty close to mine, but I must admit #5 is not really applicable to me and my 'lazy man's exercise'.

I'm actually closer to our ex-member who posted in the blog mentioned in another post; I believe diet is 90%+ and exercise, although important, is less than 10% of my regimen.

I vaguely recall the kerfuffle when she was here but had forgotten what it was about.
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey (latest: Small New York Baked Low Carb Cheesecake)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest:Dambulla, Sigiriya and Polonuwarra, Sri Lanka)

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #2 on: 03 October 2015, 01:16:47 AM »
The "other blog"  I think was Dr McKendrick and the comment on that was from a person who said this forum did nothing for T2s though she did get all her info here initially.

I like Ginger Viera because she does encapsulate what T1s should get out of life.  It's hard enough balancing insulin and carbs and sometimes you just cannot predict anything, logical though it should be Alan.

I walk long distances quite often but not every day.  Today's exercise was heaving pots full of  (mainly past it) flowers onto a bench hubby had set up. Emptying them, sorting the perennials from the annuals and re-potting the perennials.  Then emptying the pots into a sieve that hubby was using to sort out the soil and keep some to mix with next year's potting compost and so forth!
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline sedge

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #3 on: 03 October 2015, 05:29:03 PM »
Well I'm a believer (though not a Monkee LOL) but especially in the last two!

THOSE two have as much influence on the end result as any of the rest.

IM(NS)HO of course !
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline himtoo

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #4 on: 04 October 2015, 07:37:14 PM »
all pretty true -- nice one making it a sticky !!!!
T1 Dia Aug 1972 -pumping omnipod since 29/09/15  Losartan 100mg , simvastatin 40mg,Furosemide 40mg, Omeprazole 80mg , Doxazosin 8mg
Hba1c - 06/2013 6.1 02/2014 43(6.1) 07/14 42(6.0) 08/14 40( 5.8 ) 12/14 39 (5.7) 08/15 41 ( 5.9) 10/15 44 ( 6.2 ) 03/16 49 (6.6)
cholesterol --nov 2011 4.3 june 2012 4.4 June 2013 4.1 Feb 2014 4.1 dec 14 4.5 oct 15 4.4
Dafne grad. necrobiosis lipoidica on legs
laser treatment on both eyes 2002 and 2012, injections left eye 3 , wearing Noctura mask since oct 2014

Offline graj0

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #5 on: 04 October 2015, 10:33:40 PM »

The "other blog"  I think was Dr McKendrick and the comment on that was from a person who said this forum did nothing for T2s though she did get all her info here initially.


How strange, this forum has done lots for me. Thanks for your post, it serves as a very good reminder when things start going AWOL. Especially the exercise bit which I'm struggling with because I'm not supposed to do anything for a few more weeks. Not long though.
Graham
Type II since '97? Metformin 2 gm, Gliclazide 0 gm (was 240), Januvia 0 mg (was 25 mg) Atorvastatin 0 mg (was 40), Doxazosin 8 mg, Amlodapine 10 mg, Lisinopril 20 mg.

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #6 on: 05 October 2015, 03:51:54 PM »
What about doing chair exercises Graj0?
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline sophie

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #7 on: 16 February 2016, 11:01:08 AM »
I am type 2 and get a lot of support from the forum.  Without it I wouldn't be back on track. 

Offline colette3

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #8 on: 11 February 2017, 11:39:08 AM »
I tend to treat exercise as one of the major parts of my Diabetes regime.  Just shows how different we all are because I consider exercise in the same light as medication.  On the occasions when I overindulge (oh dear at the moment!!! NO!STOP!)  I can turn a not so good figure into a near normal figure by taking myself out and walking at a very brisk pace (just short of losing my breath).  That does the trick and just in case my bgs go back up after I sit down again I take them an hour later.  Always worth a try - I don't walk for miles at all because I know however painful my hip area is with a very brisk walk it will be far more painful trying to walk for miles.  Still, everyone is different as the man says!

Offline Quantum Learning

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Re: 7 Diabetes Habits of People with A1Cs Under 7.0
« Reply #9 on: 11 February 2017, 11:50:29 AM »
All so true  :)
Type 2 dx Nov 2012 with fasting BG 14%/129.5
HbA1c Jan 2013 79/9.3%
April 2013 50/6.7%
July 2013 39/5.7%
Oct 2013 39/5.7% Chol 5.9
July 2014 45/6.3% Chol 5.5
Aug 2015 61/7.7% Chol 5.9
May 2016 84/9.7% Chol 6.9
Oct 2016 53/7%  Chol 6.3
Dec 2016 41/5.9% Chol 6.0
June 2017 51/6.8% Chol 6.1
Oct 2017 52/6.9% Chol
Metformin SR 2000mg, Candesarten Cilexetil 4mg Omeprazole 20mg, Fexofenadine 180mg Co-Codamol 30/500g when needed. Amitriptyline 20mg
Toujeo/NovoRapid, Allergic to Levemir.