Author Topic: Birth stories  (Read 1890 times)

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Offline gemsa

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Birth stories
« on: 31 October 2015, 12:53:56 PM »
Thought it might be useful to start a thread on diabetic birth stories as I found it hard to find many. If people add their stories to this and the people approaching D-day find it useful then one of the admins might want to make it a pinned post.

So we'll start with mine.

 At the 36 week scan my insulin requirements had dropped by 15% and that coupled with recent reduced foetal movements and reduced weight gain (still more than an  average person but less than my typical) made them think my placenta might be starting to fail. I had previously been booked in for a c-section at 38 weeks due to predicted size but they decided he probably needed to come earlier. Due to it being preterm I was immediately admitted for steroids and then induction. The steroids would be started on the normal ward with me in control of bloods/insulin with two hourly checking but as soon as bloods rose above 10 I'd have to go up to labour ward to go on a sliding scale and be monitored hourly.

I got admitted at 12noon but the steroid injection wasn't given until 9pm (Friday). The bloods raised overnight and each check was the one we thought I'd be sent up to labour ward but it wasn't until 9am my bloods showed I needed to and by the time the midwives had finished arguing about whether or not there was space and whether my bloods were desperate enough or not I didn't get up there till 11am. The sliding scale worked really well and once the last steroid injection was in my system 12 hours and bloods had stabilised I went back down to normal ward (Sunday).

Baby's heartrate and movements were monitored morning and evening to check all was okay, and I had a show Monday so body sort of knew what was coming. It was decided to start induction first thing Tuesday morning, but again we had to wait until there was space on labour ward in case things happened fast, so the pessary wasn't inserted until 3pm. Mild contractions started at 5pm and got stronger and more frequent. Yoga breathing and leaning against the wall helped. The midwives suggested taking paracetamol and codeine before bed to help me sleep and get some energy so I did. Managed to sleep on and off. At 6am I called hubby and said "don't go into work I think it's happening today" but by 8am when he arrived contractions had completely stopped.

 We waited the full 24 hours for the pessary to work and when I was examined (Wednesday afternoon) I was soft enough to go to the next stage. It took four hours for there to be enough space to move up to labour ward to have my waters broken. So at 8pm Wednesday we moved into the room our baby would be born in, and every hour a midwife came in and said "sorry we're too busy to start you off, it'll be soon hopefully".

At 7.45am on Thursday they put me on the sliding scale and broke my waters and contractions gradually restarted. My bloods stayed within the target range very well. I had wanted an active labour and had prepped several yoga positions etc to help. However with a insulin drip and glucose drip in one arm and a syntocin drip and fluids iv in the other arm, plus a baby monitor strapping my belly to a machine I was able to stand but not really move, and the transition from standing to bed was challenging web of wires and tubes.

At 12noon they determined me as being in established labour. I found the lack of movement a right pain in the **** and contractions were getting harder to manage. I was discussing with the midwife when the optimum time to have an epidural would be - I didn't feel ready just yet but was afraid of leaving it too late and them saying I couldn't have it. In the time it took for the anesthetist to come and see me (5 minutes ish according to hubby) the contractions had increased to beyond what I could cope with so we had the epidural immediately. I was then genuinely surprised that I felt nothing. Hubby and I chatted, watched telly, read books, the midwives changed shifts, I even had a nap.

At 10pm they examined me and I was 7cm dilated. At 11pm I was 8cm. At midnight I was 9cm and they warned me I was going slowly so they monitored baby's cortisol which was fine but they said they'd monitor again in an hour and there was the possibility of needing a c-section. An hour later I hadn't dilated anymore and although the cortisol showed baby to be fine and happy they weren't really happy with how long it was taking and suggested the c-section, by which point I was so tired and exhausted and just wanted the baby healthily out we agreed.

The transfer to operating theatre bed knocked my epidural tube out and there was a debate about how long since my last dose and whether I could have another one or if it would have to be general aesthetic during which the pain had returned. We did manage a second epidural and they cut me open, baby son born at 1.37am Friday.

I had requested delayed cord clamping and they waited 2min, paediatricians were there to check over baby and then I got skin to skin after 20min. The midwife was busy ensuring all my drips were doing what they were meant to be and wouldn't let me feed him, she said we should wait until she was available to help. Finally when we were back in the labour ward room and she had completed all her paperwork she let me try our first breastfeed, an hour and a half after birth. He was too sleepy and not keen on latching so we had to give him some of my frozen expressed colostrum.

He had more heel picks than I can remember in his first day, and had two hypos which my expressed colostrum corrected. A third hypo would have put him in SCBU but we managed to avoid that. He had a warmed crib so that his blood sugar didn't have to be wasted in keeping himself warm. By Saturday morning he got the all clear on the blood test front, but he didn't take his first real breastfeed until Monday, relying on expressions fed by syringe.
 

Things I would have done differently using hindsight:
* my hospital bag was packed to deal with post-birth. I only had disposable knickers - nothing really suitable for wearing the week of waiting pre-birth!
* I wouldn't touch paracetamol for early contractions, I believe these slowed it down due to being forced contractions. See link http://undercovermidwife.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/paracetamol-and-labour.html?m=1
* fight for the right to let your baby have access to feeding as soon as they come out, not when it fits around the paperwork.
* not bother to use the warmed crib - skin to skin contact during the day and cosleeping at night would have had a more optimal effect. And would have helped with the breastfeeding.

Those four are advice I would heartily share with every diabetic (well every pregnant woman too). Then there is a fifth that I believe may not be appropriate for everyone
* not to have syntocin. If the pessary and waters breaking don't get it started then go for c-section and have some energy and be in control. See this link http://www.bellybelly.com.au/birth/natural-labour-vs-induced-labour/
T1 diagnosed 1985, DAFNE Oct 2012 (HBA 9.2%), started pumping April 2013.
HBAs: Feb 2013 8.6%, Jan 2014 7.4%, June 2014 5.9%, Jan 2015 7.5%
Healthy baby delivered Nov 2014 predicted 97th+centile but actually 50th centile.

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #1 on: 31 October 2015, 03:18:17 PM »
It sounds a bit horrific Gemsa...

However, I agree it's a good idea to share birth stories and I will gladly make it a sticky.
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline sedge

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #2 on: 31 October 2015, 04:06:41 PM »
Most births sound horrific to me!  LOL

BUT - I'm really glad to see someone telling it like it really is - and I'm sure most women who actually WANT to know, will find it helpful.
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline gemsa

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #3 on: 01 November 2015, 03:43:47 PM »
It was frustrating with a lot of waiting, but not horrific. I think I was more nervous as I didn't know what to expect. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you can't use that for your first one so hopefully my hindsight can help others.

But also its worth remembering a diabetic birth story is a birth story with diabetes added on. There are some bits most diabetics will have in all their stories, but many parts are just how individuals give birth individually. Unless you've had a chance to read several diabetic birth stories you won't be able to get a feel for what part is the diabetes and what part is the birth.
T1 diagnosed 1985, DAFNE Oct 2012 (HBA 9.2%), started pumping April 2013.
HBAs: Feb 2013 8.6%, Jan 2014 7.4%, June 2014 5.9%, Jan 2015 7.5%
Healthy baby delivered Nov 2014 predicted 97th+centile but actually 50th centile.

Offline Dollyrocker

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #4 on: 02 November 2015, 12:27:38 PM »
Gosh Gemsa, sound like you had a bit of an ordeal, I'm glad it all worked out well in the end.

I was admitted to hospital with suspected pre-eclampsia at 36 weeks, they kept me in for 2 days then let me go home but I went back into hospital the day after as I was in pain from horrendous carpal tunnel and had some visual disturbances, they decided the day after, Saturday, when I was 37 weeks, to get things moving but since they were really busy I didn't get seen till 5pm when I had the pessary, I was told I'd be seen again in 24 hours and have my waters broken if nothing was happening but it was 9pm before they saw me and I think they gave me a sweep instead.

By morning still nothing had happened besides some tightening and cramps overnight so I was waiting or them to take me to have my waters broken. Then at about 10.30 while trying to get comfy in the bed to watch Jeremy Kyle they broke! I rang my husband at wiork and told him not to rush as it would probably be a while but shortly after that it all went crazy and I was in full labour within the hour, I still dont remember a lot of it but  I know there were a lot of people in the room, they were clattering about with catherters and baby became distressed. I was offered an epidural earlier onbut was too out of it to know my name let alone sign the form for so long that baby arrived before the anesthetist did! He was delivered by ventouse and episiotomy at around 1.30pm, 6lb 12oz, I had my pump the whole time (never made it onto a sliding scale) luckily I also had CGM running, I think I was between 7 and 9 just before he was born, the diabetes registrar came to see me after with my birth plan!

We finally made it to the post natal ward by 9pm, his blood sugar was low on delivery so he got fed every 2 hours through the night but was fine by morning, we were told on Tuesday we could go home the next day but by Wednesday morning I had high blood pressure and he had jaundice and a temperature and hadn't been feeding very well, so he had to spend 8 hours on a light bed. I never got the chance to collect colostrum though I had planned to and because he had a tongue-tie which we couldn't get fixed till the Friday, breast feeding was very difficult so I expressed for a while and he had a mix of formula and breast milk.


7/2014 7.2 (55) / 4/2015 7.3 (56) 1/2016 7.0 (53)
pumping with a shitty Accu Chek Insight

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #5 on: 02 November 2015, 02:34:18 PM »
Pardon me for asking, but what is a sweep?  My mind is boggling with visions of witches' brooms.
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Dollyrocker

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #6 on: 02 November 2015, 03:01:15 PM »
That would probably be less painful Patti!

It's when a nurse tries to 'nick' the membrane thingy to get waters to break and start labour

It hurt. A lot!


7/2014 7.2 (55) / 4/2015 7.3 (56) 1/2016 7.0 (53)
pumping with a shitty Accu Chek Insight

Offline sedge

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #7 on: 02 November 2015, 05:34:16 PM »
Yup Patti - a hand further up your vagina than either you or I know about, since neither of us has ever given birth - to try and break your waters.  Obviously - the membrane is INSIDE your womb ........

It often doesn't work and absolutely everyone that has to have one says it's utterly vile and mega stega painful.

Just Oww, and I have instinctively crossed my legs typing this!
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #8 on: 02 November 2015, 06:15:15 PM »
Ah... thank you ladies!  Since I have never given birth I had no idea.
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Venomous

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #9 on: 04 November 2015, 09:56:26 AM »
I don't think they're meant to nick the membranes during a sweep, just to put their hand between it and the womb to get it to detach a little, to hopefully trigger contractions and to start labour.

Birth experiences fade so fast from the memory. I have to recount two of my six births to provide some balance as the second story is much worse than the first. 

With my second baby I was 39 weeks pregnant, I was walking around most of the day trying to catch up on shopping etc, and I went in to the council offices to get a child benefit form for when she was born and whilst in the queue standing still I was having awful pains so I was happy to get out of there and walk home. Whilst walking home, the pains were rhythmic but I was pleasantly pain free inbetween contractions (and hadn't yet realised thats what they were) and then bent over during the pains. When I got home and was able to rest it became almost unbearable so I figured I'd call the midwife and see if she would come check me, I didn't call hubby as he was working and I didn't want to disturb him. The midwife arrived and I was 8cm dilated! She suggested she bring in a kit and we give birth at home, I wish I'd done that as it would have been a brilliant home birth (and I've never had one) but I opted to call hubby and get us hopefully to the hospital. By the time he'd dropped off our first I was literally holding my legs together and could hardly get into the car as I couldn't bend in the middle by then. We got to hospital and the nurses were waiting in the car park for us. Managed to get into a room and literally grab onto the taps of the sink and she was born right there as I was standing up at the sink! Estimated labour time, 90 minutes, zero pain relief. Baby 8lbs 8oz. I had quite a bit of internal tearing and had to be sewn up, but afterwards they can pretty much do what they like, endorphins take over. She breast fed straight away, we had a nice sleep in the hospital and then went home.

For Lily last year, I was having weekly scans to assess her size etc, and at 34 weeks they said the amniotic fluid was decreased and she wasn't getting enough oxygen to her brain so they would admit me that day for delivery. I actually spent three days on labour ward having steroid injections (kept blood sugars under 5.0 during that whole time!!). I was told I could stay off the insulin pump until I reached 7.5 so I surprised them all by staying off the pump until being taken down for cesarean. She was eventually born at 34 weeks and 5 days, by cesarean, with hubby sitting by my side. I was able to see her little face and then they rushed her off to special care as she was in respiratory distress. Then things went crazy as suddenly I could feel all the pain of them pulling around inside of me and the anaesthetist was telling them to pause while she gave me more meds. Hubby says I started flailing around and he was holding my arms down as that's where the anaesthetologist was inserting the meds. I don't remember flailing about nor anything else until someone asking my name as they were readying me to go to ICU. I had stopped breathing and Hubby was then asked to leave the room. I was later told I stopped breathing for 6 and a half minutes, the anaesthetologist intubated me and breathed for me while they patched me up. We entered that room at 12.30 mid day and I was finally wheeled out of it at 4pm. I stayed in ICU overnight with hubby sleeping in a chair by my side. Something about the meds they had given me meant my brain kept shutting down and I would fall asleep mid sentence. It wore off within a few days. We were able to see Lily the next day, and I had the first of many massive hypos as they wheeled me out of her special care room that the hospital had to treat. They were giving her oxygen and baby milk but I started expressing breastmilk for her too. She came off oxygen in a few days but did need blood transfusions and sugar. The nurses in the post labour ward really didn't have a clue how to treat hypos. Hubby wouldn't go home at night without leaving me orange juice,bread and yoghurt. Lily weighed 5lb 2oz. She was released to me after 10 days and I was still on the ward so we finally had time together on her tenth day. The following day I was discharged. We had a week at home, then I was admitted again with an infection (a haematoma) in the wound and I refused to be admitted without Lily with me as we were still sorting out breastfeeding and they wouldn't allow me to be responsible for her so they ended up admitting me, Lil AND hubby! I had IV antibiotics and an MRI scan which revealed a "collection" (infection) behind the womb as well as the other in the wound.  We were finally discharged properly on the day that she was a month old. I went back to work the next day! I'm still having problems with my insides 18 months later having developed adhesions that have "twisted" my womb, tubes, ovaries etc. But I am very happy to have a beautiful baby daughter.
T2 and PCOS. Just had large serous adenofibroma removed with ovary and fallopian tube. Bp is now normal!

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, metformin.

Offline heuston

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #10 on: 17 November 2015, 11:22:27 AM »
Haven't been on for ages....this thread is a great idea:)

I was due to be induced at 38 weeks as per my hospitals protocol. I had an appointment with my consultant at 37w 3d. I deep down knew that I would likely be admitted as I was fairly swollen and whale like! BP had been creeping up. So what did I do? I took my labour bag out of the boot of the car and told my hubby "I'll be home tonight, wait and see!" Cons examined me and basically said "Righto - you're having him tomorrow by C-section". I was pre-eclamptic. I have to say that my Cons was great - very straight forward lady. She asked me to trust her opinions and also instincts about me - that she felt she could certainly induce me but she had a strong feeling based on her experience that I would more that likely end up as an emergency C-section and she would much rather I have the better experience of a calm, planned procedure. (Turns out she was 100% correct - more about that later!)

So the night before I was stressed, worrying etc and of course I had horrific hypos! This was awkward as these happened at 4am, there was no hypo gel on the ward and all I had was disgusting Lucozade. I really struggled to get it up from 2.1 (sorry old money values). Took 2 bottles of the vile stuff to eventually get me to sit at around 6. I hadn't factored in the stress causing hypos so this may be worth remembering as I was obviously fasting for the op that morning.

The birth itself was great. All very calm and relaxed. Was on drip which worked a treat - no issues with bg levels at all. When my little boy was born the surgeon told me that there was no way he could have been born safely naturally as his shoulders were fairly wide - he was a hefty 9lb 12ozs! I was glad I had taken on board and trusted my Obs opinion.

Babs had one minor low bg but did end up in SCBU for 2 days due to "grunting" - just needed to be monitored and nothing to do with being a diabetic mum.

Only issue I had was that I was projectile vomiting whenever I ate anything the day of the surgery. I put this down to the Lucozade the night before. It took a couple of anti sickness injection to sort it out and was fine by that evening.

Healing was fine, again no issues. Was up walking within 12 hours. Well, hobbling I should say.

All in all I consider it a very positive experience.

Offline sedge

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #11 on: 17 November 2015, 11:57:06 AM »
Ah - OTOH isn't sudden hypos at that point in a pregnancy, a sure sign of the placenta failing? - pardon me for not instantly believing you it was 'just' stress - as I've never been there!  (I mean preg not in mega stress LOL)
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #12 on: 17 November 2015, 07:10:05 PM »
Thanks for the story Heuston and welcome back to the forum!  How are you now?
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline heuston

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #13 on: 18 November 2015, 10:14:33 AM »
Hi guys, all good here. Re: the hypos - it was definite stress related. It was just the one particularly bad one at 4am when I was due for surgery at 8.30am!! No issues with placenta thank goodness.  I mentioned it as was something I had not even considered happening.

Offline sedge

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Re: Birth stories
« Reply #14 on: 18 November 2015, 03:14:20 PM »
No - nor me!  obviously!   I apologise some more.  And I expect I wouldn't be alone in my lack of knowledge there, so thank you!
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4