Author Topic: Australian boy given too much insulin  (Read 712 times)

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Offline GrammaBear

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Offline sedge

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #1 on: 07 June 2017, 09:21:19 PM »
You would think where insulin is concerned that all medical staff would be required to check the dosage with someone else before administering it.  I mean when they do a drugs round in an NHS hospital - the trolley is accompanied by two staff who both check everything before handing over whatever it is to the person in the bed - including one of them holding your wrist up and reading out your name and hospital number to the other one - despite them both being displayed on the bed itself.  They do this for an aspirin let alone anything more dangerous.

But - yes! - mistakes do still happen.  In the NHS this is recorded as a 'major incident' - I've been the patient this has happened to.  You are given a formal apology (and an offer of having that confirmed in writing) by a consultant and given a chance to discuss it until you're blue in the face - by this stage mine was already sorted and no harm was caused - but it HAS to be done before they can sign it off formally as 'sorted' - even though it had all been sorted to everyone's satisfaction prior to that anyway!  I said to the consultant that as far as I was concerned he didn't need to have this meeting with me - the person who made the error had retired by then anyway - and he laughed and said as far as he was concerned actually - he HAD to do it since it was recorded with the hospital formally as a 'major' event (and didn't add 'so I need to get the paper trail to show we've done it properly' LOL)
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline GrammaBear

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #2 on: 07 June 2017, 09:45:10 PM »
Jenny - The procedure you described for administering medicines in the hospital is identical to the procedure done in our local hospital.  I do feel sorry for the young boy though because he must have been frightened at the very least.  And think what the nurse that made the mistake must feel like.....very upset I am guessing?
Type 1
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Dexcom G4 CGM Sep 2007
A1C 6.4%~ June 2017

Offline Alan

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #3 on: 08 June 2017, 02:29:14 AM »
Quote
"The nurse didn't notice, me and my son actually told them, 'he'd had 44 units in emergency, why are you giving him more for?', and they panicked and then doctors and everything came out of nowhere." Chris was released from hospital on Tuesday with his mother labelling the actions of the medical staff disgusting.
"He could have got brain damage if I hadn't said he's had this much amount of medication, he could have gone into a diabetic coma and possibly died," Ms Walton said.
"When this happened, the doctor basically told me accidents happen, no one's perfect... it's disgusting really."

Absolutely inexcusable.

Not only do the hospital procedures need urgent review, that doctor needs some counselling on communication with family of patients.
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey (latest: Small New York Baked Low Carb Cheesecake)
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Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #4 on: 08 June 2017, 05:06:23 AM »
I agree with Alan regarding the Dr.  In my limited experience of general nursing staff (including A&E) their knowledge of insulin is very very limited.  However, since the boy was being treated for ketones you would have thought that someone more knowledgeable would have been treating him.
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Paulines7

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #5 on: 08 June 2017, 08:32:33 AM »
How awful!  I am pleased the lad survived without any permanent damage though. 
Diabetes Type2 diagnosed March 2014.  Treated by diet only.  HbA1c 60 on diagnosis, 52 in June 2014, 50 October 2014, 44 December 2014, 48 May 2015, 50 Sep 2015, 53 Jan 2016, 50 Oct 2016, 56 Feb 2017, 50 Jun 2017. 50 Aug 2017.  Pacemaker fitted 2008.

When I get old I don't want people thinking
                      "What a sweet little old lady"........
                             I want 'em saying
                    "Oh Crap! Whats she up to now ?"

Offline Venomous

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #6 on: 08 June 2017, 07:47:07 PM »
Awful!

This is why I hate when they take all meds away from us when we go in hospital. I've had them come and remove my insulin and lock it away behind the bed. They want to be in control of all meds, when we're the ones that usually give it to ourselves. I'm pretty sure that boy or his Mum wouldn't have made a mistake between 4 and 44 units!!!
T2 and PCOS. Waiting for surgery on large ovarian masses.

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, gliclazide, metformin.
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Offline Liam

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #7 on: 08 June 2017, 09:20:13 PM »
I know what you mean V. They even want my meter off me. They'd have a harder time now I'm on a pump. I think if he was being treated for DKA that the insulin was likely via a drip rather than injected. Don't think it says in the link.
DX Type I 1994.    Novorapid Animas Vibe pump
HbA1c 3/10 10.2%, 7/10 8.1%, 12/10 7.5%.
2/11 7.8%, 8/11 8.6% 9/11 8.3%.
3/12 62 (7.8%). 10/12 67 (8.3%)
4/13 63 (7.9%) 6/13 59 (7.5%)
1/14 71 (8.6%) 7/14 59 (7.5%) 11/14 (6.7%)
3/15 56 (7.3%) 12/15 49 (6.6%)
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Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #8 on: 16 June 2017, 06:22:28 PM »
I was in hospital for my angiography yesterday from 7:30 till 17:00. They asked me to bring in a couple of days supply of meds as some patients are kept in for observation. I was allowed to keep my meds - note I was in a side room not an open ward. As I was fasting beforehand I had my first insulin of the day about an hour after the procedure. The dose was double checked by the nursing staff and me. They did however check their meter against mine but the difference was within the error range.

I was overdosed as a youngster when a nurse made an error because insulin was available in different strengths then. It makes me shudder to think what might have happened if I had not guessed what had happened when a monster hypo started to kick in shortly after breakfast!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline GrammaBear

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #9 on: 17 June 2017, 12:04:58 AM »
I was in hospital for my angiography yesterday from 7:30 till 17:00. They asked me to bring in a couple of days supply of meds as some patients are kept in for observation. I was allowed to keep my meds - note I was in a side room not an open ward. As I was fasting beforehand I had my first insulin of the day about an hour after the procedure. The dose was double checked by the nursing staff and me. They did however check their meter against mine but the difference was within the error range.

I was overdosed as a youngster when a nurse made an error because insulin was available in different strengths then. It makes me shudder to think what might have happened if I had not guessed what had happened when a monster hypo started to kick in shortly after breakfast!


It makes me shudder to think what could have happened to you also when the nurse made the error.  They might not have been quick with a remedy for the monster hypo, good thing you were aware of what had gone on in your insulin dose. 

Several years ago when I was in the hospital for low sodium, the first thing the nurse wanted me to do was to hand over my pump.  When I asked her why, she said "Because we put everyone on a sliding scale."  I refused and she became quite upset with me.  Shortly after that the nurse supervisor came to talk to me.  She asked me several questions about how the pump worked and I answered them, apparently to her satisfaction.  She said "You can keep the pump attached, just please let us know when you check your blood sugar and when you administer your insulin."
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Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #10 on: 17 June 2017, 02:08:47 PM »
Before standardisation at 100u there was 20u, 40u, 80u and even a 320u strength. I suspect that quite a number of errors were made pre-standardisation. Apparently there are some 200u and 300u versions of some insulins but I hope they are used with extreme caution!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline Liam

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #11 on: 17 June 2017, 03:03:38 PM »
The 200-300u ones are mostly for people with high insulin resistance. So they can take massive doses in a smaller volume. If I remember right you can still get other strength insulin outside the UK. A quick google of other insulin strengths is mostly returning results for diabetic pets.
DX Type I 1994.    Novorapid Animas Vibe pump
HbA1c 3/10 10.2%, 7/10 8.1%, 12/10 7.5%.
2/11 7.8%, 8/11 8.6% 9/11 8.3%.
3/12 62 (7.8%). 10/12 67 (8.3%)
4/13 63 (7.9%) 6/13 59 (7.5%)
1/14 71 (8.6%) 7/14 59 (7.5%) 11/14 (6.7%)
3/15 56 (7.3%) 12/15 49 (6.6%)
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Offline sedge

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #12 on: 19 June 2017, 11:40:42 PM »
I know they do Lantus at 300u/ml which is available for home use when necessary.  Scary!

Mind you - when our Sharon had meningitis they infused her with intravenous paracetamol in 10ml vials - and she got through quite a few.

So there are all sorts of things that we don't have a clue about that are commonly used in A&E and wards.
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4

Offline Alan

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #13 on: 23 June 2017, 08:25:39 AM »
Before standardisation at 100u there was 20u, 40u, 80u and even a 320u strength. I suspect that quite a number of errors were made pre-standardisation. Apparently there are some 200u and 300u versions of some insulins but I hope they are used with extreme caution!

There is also u-500.
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey (latest: Small New York Baked Low Carb Cheesecake)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest:Dambulla, Sigiriya and Polonuwarra, Sri Lanka)

Offline sedge

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Re: Australian boy given too much insulin
« Reply #14 on: 23 June 2017, 11:17:21 AM »
Yep - just can't imagine needing that (anyone I mean, not just me)  Although I spose (well, no - I know)  if someone's insulin resistance is that high - then they deserve a chance to stay alive same as the rest of us.  Just I can't imagine it.
Jenny

T1 DX 1972, pumping Novorapid 24/05/11

HbA1c - 7/07 8.7, 1/08 7.8, 9/08 8.4, 3/09 7.3, 7/09 7.2, 12/09 7.3, 11/10 8.1, 2/11 8.6, 9/11 6.5 2/12 6.4  5/12 50/6.7  11/12 52/6.9  01/13 46/6.4  06/16 46/6.4  12/16 45/6.4