Author Topic: Getting Depressed  (Read 646 times)

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Offline Dr DeEath

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Getting Depressed
« on: 08 August 2017, 01:59:12 PM »
Although I do not usually bubble over with the joys of spring I am usually fairly upbeat. I did go through a period in my mid-twenties of feeling quite depressed when I got despondent about what careers were unavailable to me because of diabetes, that talk of an imminent cure was utter nonsense, not being able to eat and drink what bI liked, etc. My GP prescribed valium which did nothing for me and, I feel, made it worse. These days all the various medical issues (PAD, CVD and retinopathy) are getting me down again. Particularly frustrating are the speed of cardiology department. I rang them today and they had not even reviewed the results of my CT scan. This is made worse by the combination of drugs making me feel fairly tired - my GP says it is because they reduce stress on the heart and asked me to bear with it. I think what tipped the balance at the weekend was when someone said "you can't be d that bad - you are still alive and have not had a heart attack". He nearly suffered an attack of another kind! So how can I lift my mood - the last thing I want is more pills!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #1 on: 08 August 2017, 03:04:58 PM »
I find having something to look forward to always lifts my mood.  A holiday or a special outing.  Spending time with friends...most of all sunshine...how about a short break somewhere lovely?

Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Quantum Learning

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #2 on: 08 August 2017, 05:11:27 PM »
Personally I find I can more or less cope with a couple or 3 things not right in my life (pretty much all the time, actually) but when it ramps up to 4 or 5 it starts to hit me. I know you have several 'extra' things going on with you at the mo so it's not surprising to me you're not feeling your 'normal' self and I understand not wanting more pills but anti-depressants have come a long way since you were given Valium. If you don't have a lift of your mood I would give them a try, nobody should be feeling really bad when there is stuff that 'helps'.
Type 2 dx Nov 2012 with fasting BG 14%/129.5
HbA1c Jan 2013 79/9.3%
April 2013 50/6.7%
July 2013 39/5.7%
Oct 2013 39/5.7% Chol 5.9
July 2014 45/6.3% Chol 5.5
Aug 2015 61/7.7% Chol 5.9
May 2016 84/9.7% Chol 6.9
Oct 2016 53/7%  Chol 6.3
Dec 2016 41/5.9% Chol 6.0
June 2017 51/6.8% Chol 6.1
Oct 2017 52/6.9% Chol
Metformin SR 2000mg, Candesarten Cilexetil 4mg Omeprazole 20mg, Fexofenadine 180mg Co-Codamol 30/500g when needed. Amitriptyline 20mg
Toujeo/NovoRapid, Allergic to Levemir.

Offline Venomous

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #3 on: 08 August 2017, 07:51:59 PM »
I identify so much with that because this waiting that I've had for the surgery on my ovaries and the lack of control I had over all that and the seeming "dont care" by the medical profession made me feel despair, hopelessness, increased pain and depression. Complaining about it was difficult also because the complaint took so long for them to deal with (a couple of months) and then they made me jump through several hoops before they'd reschedule the operation. It's been three years since they first noticed these lumps, 2 yrs of them "watching" them to see what would happen, and a whole year now since they first tried surgery. I guess I do think that if I hadn't have complained to the trust they wouldn't even have agreed to do the surgery yet even...and we still don't even know if the masses are cancerous. I think this is really neglectful and if something happens to me because of the amount of time that they have taken, I hope my husband sues them for every penny he can.

My point being.... I think depression is natural and normal considering how long the cardio appointments are taking and the uncertaincy you are dealing with.

I think it reprehensible that our NHS is in this state and doctors can treat us like this.... the anxiety so much waiting causes has horrible negative effects on the patient, the person, the individual and that effects his family and his friends and his daily life.

Consider complaining, as this may help you to feel you are doing something to improve your experience. You need to keep written notes of each appointment, or phone call, or letter, who you speak with and what they say and how you are feeling. I would hope that the complaint hurries along your treatment and improves your care if at all possible, but do be aware the process of the complaint takes awhile also.

There are many other things you can do to help ease the pain of depression but you have to find the things that help you personally. Not everything helps everyone, it's another of those YMMV situations. Some ideas are:

Do something about the situation that is depressing you. Do not try to ignore it or avoid it but work on through it.
Find and utilise what daily activities are soothing for you, whether this is something as simple as a hot sweet cup of tea (dang the sugar) or a hot bath (beware the hypo) or a walk each day (if this is physically possible).
It's very nice to have something to look forward to, whether it be a holiday (even planning an imaginary one) or an outing to the theatre or whatever else you'd like to do that takes a good bit of effort and planning. The act of accepting that challenge and giving yourself an intrinsic reward is really emotionally positive.
Talk to others about your feelings, chat on here, speak to someone you trust, ask for therapy from the GP even, anything that keeps you talking can help.
Find some way of helping others. Depression (and I have experienced it many times myself so I feel I can say this without it sounding accusatory) depression is 'selfish'... if you can consider others rather than yourself that can help ease the depression also. Whether you manage to somehow help a loved one or even a stranger, it is really personally rewarding and can help lift that depressive feeling.
Don't feel ashamed if you do need some antidepressants, there are many more modern forms of antidepressants these days, I doubt very much whether you'd be offered valium even if you did ask for some medicinal help.
Think of having a list of things that you can do in and of that instant if everything gets too much that you can't think straight and are emotionally overwhelmed, whether it's to call a trusted friend or the samaritans or to go see your GP or even something as simple as to post on here.... I know everyone here would be more than willing to help.

Don't give in. We're on your side and you're not alone.
T2 and PCOS. Waiting for surgery on large ovarian masses.

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, gliclazide, metformin.
Aspirin, Diltiazem.

Offline nytquill17

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #4 on: 08 August 2017, 10:46:50 PM »
You may really enjoy the book "Full Catastrophe Living" by Jon Kabat-Zinn (I've mentioned it on here before). Skip the diet part in the 2nd half, he really pushes a vegetarian, low-fat agenda. But the rest is fantastic stuff. It's essentially the written version of an 8-week program that Kabat-Zinn helped run at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center; the program was aimed at  teaching people to meditate that had physical injuries or diseases that were affecting their mental health, as part of a research program on mind-body wellness. So it's based on some of the same ideas as zen meditation but with some scientific and experimental backing. There are exercises given and specific chapters for specific things like pain, anxiety, depression.

I'm a big fan of mindfulness meditation generally, which I've mentioned on the forum before. It's not everyone's cup of tea, of course, but it has really helped me cope with depression and anxiety. I was on Zoloft for a while when I was at my lowest point, and it did help, although I think just the fact of being seen and having someone else agree with me that I was in a bad way accounts for some or even most of it! Unfortunately for depression it's trial and error to find the medication that works for you and that doesn't have intolerable side effects, and each trial can take 4-6 weeks to build up to full effect where you can judge whether it's working! So it can be a long slog to find the right drug - which doesn't mean there isn't one out there for you, though I understand not wanting any more pills, too. But you know how they always tell people suffering from depression "if you were a diabetic you wouldn't feel bad for taking insulin!"? Well this is the reverse of that!  ;D  If you need it, you need it, in the end.


But other than therapy, mindfulness meditation has really done the most for me. It's particularly good for depression that is more "thoughts and habits based" than "chemical based", if I can phrase it like that. If you have the habit of thinking or responding to things in a way that dredges up certain feelings, mindfulness meditation can help you learn to "catch yourself in the act" and short circuit the downward spiral. It's similar to CBT but can be done at home - or anywhere really! Like anything, it takes a while to build up. You're trying to form new habits in how you respond to your own thoughts and feelings. But overtime it really does help.

There's also an app / website called Headspace that teaches you meditation with a voice explaining things to you as you go. I particularly like it as it's very no-frills, not trying to be particularly spiritual or anything, so it's not off-putting if you happen not to agree with the voice guy's spiritual views - he doesn't talk about them! The introductory recordings (10 of them, I think) are free and you can listen to them as many times as you want.
T1 DX 1995
Levemir + Novorapid
 
  ~-~-~-~
"If you can't ride, can you fall?"
"I suppose anyone can fall," said Shasta.
"I mean can you fall and get up again without crying, and mount again and fall again and yet not be afraid of falling?"
"I - I'll try," said Shasta.
  ~C.S. Lewis, The Horse and His Boy
  ~-~-~-~
"There is no answer; seek it lovingly."

Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #5 on: 09 August 2017, 01:15:09 PM »
Thanks for the replies. I feel a touch better today - probably because I drunk most of a bottle of red last night despite warnings on the new meds. In fact I felt worse when I had the GTN spray for the CT scan. I think what tipped it yesterday was despite the fact I was advised to dial 999 if I felt really unwell (how do you define that?) they had not looked at the CT scan in over two weeks. It seems at times the NHS has forgotten what Proactive means concentrating on the Reactive!

P.S. I am not advising drinking and would never drink on a drug like Tramadol!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline Venomous

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #6 on: 10 August 2017, 07:23:12 PM »
Glad you're on an up turn.

Yes, they are running round dousing out fires instead of preventing them in the first place!
T2 and PCOS. Waiting for surgery on large ovarian masses.

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, gliclazide, metformin.
Aspirin, Diltiazem.

Offline BBarb

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #7 on: 10 August 2017, 07:40:09 PM »
I've been going through a similar bout of despair over my eyes.  After three years of complaining from me and lots of visits to the hospitals and opticians where I was more or less told \i was being a super fussy old lady, I was finally told by the consultant that there is little they can do because I 'left it too late'.  If tackled within a couple of months there was a hope of a complete cure.
Finally I realised that whats done is done and I have to deal with it.
The book by Jon Kabat-Zinn sounds interesting, I'd never thought of meditating - have you?
Thinking of you, you're not alone!

Offline BBarb

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #8 on: 12 August 2017, 11:16:18 AM »
I do hope the sun is coming out for you today.

Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #9 on: 15 August 2017, 01:29:23 PM »
Things are moving again of a fashion. I got a copy of the letter to my GP from the vascular clinic saying he could refer me back for review once the cardio problems were sorted out. The last Doppler on my left leg was 0.3 - I cannot imagine a significant improvement post heart surgery. At ophthalmology next Monday but still nothing from cardio!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline Venomous

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #10 on: 15 August 2017, 06:31:48 PM »
It all moves very slowly!
T2 and PCOS. Waiting for surgery on large ovarian masses.

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, gliclazide, metformin.
Aspirin, Diltiazem.

Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #11 on: 16 August 2017, 01:46:39 PM »
It all moves very slowly!

Which all adds to the unavoidable stress. Every appointment I am told to dial 999 if I become really ill but have never been told what really is! Then weeks pass with nothing happenng!
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.

Offline Venomous

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #12 on: 16 August 2017, 07:05:50 PM »
I know what you mean. I get in so much pain and think... just gotta hang on, surgery soon, and the crisis passes for now.... but it's torturous!!
T2 and PCOS. Waiting for surgery on large ovarian masses.

Novorapid, levemir, trulicity, gliclazide, metformin.
Aspirin, Diltiazem.

Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #13 on: 17 August 2017, 09:26:46 AM »
Well, of course it's a vicious circle.  Any stress raises BG and in turn you feel under the weather and less able to deal with the cause of the stress.


Right now I am under considerable stress myself and, it seems, unable to get BGs under about 9 - 10 which in itself it making me feel lethargic and ill.
Patti


Type 1.  Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11.  Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 April 2016.


© 2015 Patti Evans

Offline Dr DeEath

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Re: Getting Depressed
« Reply #14 on: 17 August 2017, 02:05:30 PM »
I was told the drugs to protect my heart cause a degree of tiredness but I should be able to stop then after treatment (whenever that may be).
T1 for over 50 years.  MDI on Porcine insulin.  Lisinopril and Atorvastatin.