Author Topic: More on gluten sensitivity  (Read 62 times)

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Offline BBarb

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More on gluten sensitivity
« on: 14 November 2017, 01:21:36 PM »
This is really for Patti because her previous 'rant' about her digestive problems seems to have developed into a discussion on potatoes (we do dive into every little corner of a problem don't we).
I read something in a newspaper (I know as bad as Dr Google) and I think it was the D Mail (Wot?) about the sensitivity problem, but I can't darn well find it now, which I thought was quite interesting.  Basically it said some people show the same symptoms to gluten as coeliacs do, but it doesn't damage their gut, and that by avoiding (not necessarily cutting out altogether) grains they could live a pain free life and stay healthy.
This article is along the same lines and explains it better than me.  (I hope it scans)
/www.coeliac.org.uk/coeliac-disease/about-coeliac-disease-and-dermatitis-herpetiformis/gluten-sensitivity/

Offline BBarb

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Re: More on gluten sensitivity
« Reply #1 on: 14 November 2017, 01:31:02 PM »
I copied and pasted that link and it doesn't scan, it tells me the page is out of date - sorry.  So I've printed off a paragraph to show what I'm talking about.  Hopefully the answer for you personally might be just to decrease the amount of gluten you eat and not to cut it out altogether.  It's published by the Coeliac Society of Great Britain.

Research into non coeliac gluten sensitivity
Non coeliac gluten sensitivity is something that is being recognised as a problem in many countries across the world. This is a new area and there is a need for more research to understand the condition and who is at risk.

The exact role of the immune system in non coeliac gluten sensitivity is unclear and further research is needed. There are no specific diagnostic tests for non coeliac gluten sensitivity.

Some researchers define non coeliac gluten sensitivity as an improvement in symptoms when following a gluten-free diet. However, it is difficult to rule out the possibility of a placebo effect.

There is also some debate around whether gluten is the cause of the sensitivity or if other components are to blame, which are also removed from the diet when gluten-containing ingredients are removed, such as Fermentable Oligo- Di- Mono-saccharides and Polyols (FODMAPs) and other non-gluten proteins found in wheat.