Diabetes Support Forum

Living with diabetes => Insulin and medication => Topic started by: John on 05 May 2017, 04:33:30 PM

Title: A new adventure
Post by: John on 05 May 2017, 04:33:30 PM
And it has begun.


I had a nice meeting with my DSN this morning and after going over everything and looking at different options we have agreed that I would start on Insulin today.


It was funny she asked me how I felt about it and I said "not thrilled about it but I like seeing things and having two legs and 10 toes so we will make it work" this got a laugh.


She said we will start slow and build up and adjust things as needed so I am on 10 units/clicks of Levemir to be taken at 6pm each day and she will ring me on Monday to see how I am getting on she also gave me her direct line phone number and said to ring her if I am not happy. She also said to test every hour tonight and just before going to bed to make sure I am not going too low and to keep the meter by the bed along with glucose tablets in case I go low during the night. Also reduced my gliclazide to 160mg a day.


Seems straight forward really.  ;)


Now back to a proper diet and to get rid of all the stuff that is sending me too high, hopefully.


I am really looking forward to 6pm tonight :nurse:


john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 05 May 2017, 06:08:22 PM
John

Honestly, you will very soon get used to injecting.  It doesn't really hurt at all.  One tip, touch the end of the needle gently to your skin, if that hurts then you may have a nerve there, so move it half an inch or so and try again.  If you do stick it right in and it hurts then it's better to grin and bear it than pull it out and try somewhere else as you will already have blunted the needle.


Quote
She said we will start slow and build up and adjust things as needed so I am on 10 units/clicks of Levemir to be taken at 6pm each day
We refer to them as units, although I know she means that the pen clicks at each turn, but if you generally refer to clicks you may find people are puzzled as to what you are talking about.  That's quite a low dose of insulin especially since I presume your body weight is in the men's range.  You may find it doesn't last the full 24 hours, but it sounds like you have a good helpful nurse who will guide you through it at least to start with.

Please keep us updated on how you go on!  I shall be following your adventure with interest! ;D
 
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 05 May 2017, 06:47:01 PM
Thanks Patti

First injection done and I survived  :mandysballoon:


Seriously though no problems it might have been luck but we will see, I will try your method tomorrow.


I thought it was units but as I was typing it I wasnt sure.


I will keep you updated, now just need to sort my diet out again.


john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 05 May 2017, 07:48:42 PM
Your first hurdle over John.... let's see how your BG is in the morning!
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 06 May 2017, 01:01:55 PM
Oooh yeah, when you go through or touch a nerve, however it's over with a few secs later after you've delivered to insulin and removed the needle.

However if it's a 'thread' vein you happen to break (I reckon you go straight through em and out the far side - when you withdraw the needle, you bleed like a stuck pig!  OMG - have I breached an artery?  Am I going to bleed to death?  ..... then logic kicks in again and you realise the red stuff isn't shooting halfway across the room, just trickling out!  LOL  So grab anything handy that can be washed or chucked away and press on the site as hard as you possibly can with one finger for 'a bit' - same as when the phlebotomist takes the needle out when having blood tests.  Wait another half a minute, the GENTLY clean the dried blood off the affected bit of you.

Sounds horrific - but honestly - only happens very rarely - still a shock even now when I do it, and I could still probably count these events on the fingers of two hands even after all these years.  Have only felt the need to stick a plaster on about twice in my life, cos I happened to be wearing something very pale I didn't want stained!
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 06 May 2017, 01:49:41 PM
Oooh yeah, when you go through or touch a nerve, however it's over with a few secs later after you've delivered to insulin and removed the needle.

However if it's a 'thread' vein you happen to break (I reckon you go straight through em and out the far side - when you withdraw the needle, you bleed like a stuck pig!  OMG - have I breached an artery?  Am I going to bleed to death?  ..... then logic kicks in again and you realise the red stuff isn't shooting halfway across the room, just trickling out!  LOL  So grab anything handy that can be washed or chucked away and press on the site as hard as you possibly can with one finger for 'a bit' - same as when the phlebotomist takes the needle out when having blood tests.  Wait another half a minute, the GENTLY clean the dried blood off the affected bit of you.

Sounds horrific - but honestly - only happens very rarely - still a shock even now when I do it, and I could still probably count these events on the fingers of two hands even after all these years.  Have only felt the need to stick a plaster on about twice in my life, cos I happened to be wearing something very pale I didn't want stained!

HI Sedge
That is one of the things I worry about as I am on Warfarin and tend to bleed a lot, had a few nurses worry when they took a blood sample and it wouldnt stop for some time. But I have ways and means to sort that out so not really too worried.

john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 06 May 2017, 02:04:44 PM
I wouldn't worry to much about it John. Even on blood thinners I doubt it will be much blood. To be completely honest I've always been more worried that what was coming out was a mix of blood and insulin (and so I wasn't going to get the full dose / an unknown dose) Again like everyone has said it is rare for it to happen. I guess it might be a bit more common for you being on Warfarin.

Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 06 May 2017, 02:48:23 PM
Day 1 and nothing very good to report YET. :)


Injected at 6pm yesterday and about 1/2 hour later started to feel a bit light headed and this stayed with me all evening, woke up this morning with a headache and still have it and also a bit light headed. Possible side effects from the insulin, according to them, so I will have to wait and see what happens hopefully it will all settle down soon.


So my usual morning BG has been in the range of 12 to 14mm and after lunch and before my afternoon cuppa it is usually about 16mm before my evening meal it is around 14/15mm and about an hour and a half after meal around 18mm and about 11pm when I go to bed around 14/17mm.


A strange thing I noticed and tested last week was that if I had a cup of tea or coffee with just a small splash of semi skimmed milk an hour later my BG had gone up by 3.0mm. But if I drank it black it didnt rise at all.


So yesterday afternoon I was running a bit high for no reason that I can work out but here are my figures for yesterday PM all in mmol


15.00 - before cuppa - 20.6
18.00 - before injection and meal - 22.3
19.20 - after meal - 25.4
19.59 - 24.1
20.59 - 23.4
22.22 - 22.0
23.21 - bed time - 18.6
So coming down a bit quicker than previously but not by very much.


Had a very good nights sleep until I woke up at 5.55 this morning feeling very hot and sweating profusely probably liver dump or dawn thingy. So I got out of bed and walked around in the bathroom until I cooled down then went back to bed. Woke up 2 hours later, well it is Saturday and swore at myself for not taking my BG at 5.55. Got washed etc and took my BG it was 11.3 took it again 20 min later and it was 12.9 so I had a cuppa. Took another reading at 11.15 I was 14.8 had another cuppa before lunch at 12.48 I was at 13.2 and so it goes on.


So some evidence it is working also that I need to change dose to maybe twice a day and lower the evening one. However I dont want to upset my DSN so need to talk to her first and it is only the evidence of the first day so things might change over the next few days and I will talk to her on Monday.


I wish this headache would go.


john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 06 May 2017, 02:51:23 PM
I wouldn't worry to much about it John. Even on blood thinners I doubt it will be much blood. To be completely honest I've always been more worried that what was coming out was a mix of blood and insulin (and so I wasn't going to get the full dose / an unknown dose) Again like everyone has said it is rare for it to happen. I guess it might be a bit more common for you being on Warfarin.



Hi Liam
I try not to worry about these things but I know how bad it can be, I had to go to the hospital one day because after a finger prick it just wouldnt stop bleeding. It wasnt very fast but there still seemed to be a lot of it, they put a bit of superglue on it which worked. I wish I had thought of that as I have a load of it in the workshop.

john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 06 May 2017, 06:23:20 PM
I wouldn't expect much in the way of results yet. They always start you on too low a dose and slowly move it up until it starts working. This is a safety thing, they are super worried about hypos. There is some good reasons for that but as a insulin user we tend to get so used to them and aren't maybe as worried as we should be. I'm sure the nurse will up the dose next time you speak to them.

Your average BG is pretty high so you might feel a bit strange just from it coming down. Bit early for this since your numbers haven't come down much yet. The body sort of gets used to being high and can think lower numbers are a bad thing. It soon resets and gets used to 'normal' levels again.

I personally wouldn't worry too much about smallish rises of say 3 right now. What you need is a lowering of your average BG, once you are down in the 5-10 range then you can look at the ups and downs.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 06 May 2017, 07:12:33 PM
In addition to what Liam says (his remarks about your body needing to re-set it's warnings when BGs are a bit lower than they were, is spot on), you must know that Levemir has nothing to do with what you eat.  It is a background insulin only, which regulates bodily functions such as breathing, heart beating etc.  Please read this page for a more detailed explanation http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/info/?page_id=120 (http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/info/?page_id=120)

Anything you eat or drink that has carbs in it will raise BGs despite the Levemir - to address intake of carbs you will need a rapid acting (or bolus) insulin, but since you are on gliclazide your own insulin may still be able to address meals when you take the glic.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 07 May 2017, 12:06:48 AM
Oh - and OK you have literally a shedload of superglue - but the thing is those nozzles have been in contact with a number of surfaces when using it before so can pick up all sorts of passing detritus along the way - wood dust, metal dust, good normal dust passing by on the air or anything.  This is why they use very tiny tubes of it in A&E, which even if they only use literally one drop - they sling the rest of the tube away.  Apart from the passing germs in a hospital environment anyway of course. 

Best treat yourself to a new tube, and keep it with other medical supplies to distinguish it from the DIY ones !

Not as vicious as Warfarin by any means - however both Patti and I have been on Clopidogrel, another blood thinner, for some time - and I haven't noticed any more 'gushers' or bruises, since I started taking it.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 07 May 2017, 09:26:33 AM
Nor have I Sedge, but since we don't get dire warnings with Clopidogrel as people on Warfarin do, I've assumed it doesn't thin so aggressively?
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 07 May 2017, 01:45:09 PM
HI Liam

Not worried about fast results as I know that anything worth having takes a bit of work and time so I will just keep plodding on  :)


Having said that things seem to be starting to move my highest BG yesterday was 19.3mm which was an hour after my main meal and it was below the before reading 2 hours later, time will tell if that is a fluke or not.


In my discussion with my DSN she said not to alter my diet too much in the first week so we could see what happens.

Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 07 May 2017, 02:11:28 PM

HI Patti


As I said sometimes a ton of bricks is needed and you deliver them so well and at the right time, this is a compliment in case you are wondering.


I did read that page on Friday but I think the info you mentioned got lost in amongst the other stuff I was reading on some of the establishment sites which don’t seem to mention this at all. There info just seems to say that basal insulin works on your BG 24 hours a day and bolus is for mealtimes.


It is not that I disbelieved you but I had another search to see how basal works and once I knew what I was looking for found other sites which are more general medical based than just diabetes and found a lot of info which matches into what you have said perfectly.


I think I have it straight now but I could be wrong, here is my simplistic view of what has/is happening.


When I was diagnosed with type 2 back in 2006 my body either wasnt producing enough insulin or had become resistant to it so I was put on Metformin to counter act this and for several years everything was OK and I had good control.


Over the last 3 to 4 years my BG has been increasing and this has probably been because my Pancreas has been producing less and less insulin. As we know the body is very good at preserving life so the insulin I have been producing has been used mainly to keep the body working and anything left over has been used to control BG.


So now I am on basal injections so that will go to running my body and than any left over from that together with any insulin my pancreas is producing is used to correct my BG. If there isn’t enough left over to combat spikes etc then I might have to go on bolus as well.


As I said it was a simplistic view any corrections, comments etc good or bad are always welcome.

Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 07 May 2017, 02:43:31 PM
Hi Jenny

Sorry I should have said a fridge full of super glue as that is where I keep the unused bottles as it keeps them fresh, I also have some disposable thin tips which fit on the bottles. I have used it in the past to fix minor cuts which wouldn't stop bleeding and I always use a bottle from the fridge and a new disposable tip which I throw away afterwards. The only problem with this is that my wife complains about having a fridge full of glue.

With regards to Clopidogrel and warfarin according to my consultant they work in two different ways the Clopidogrel acts as a lubricant type of thing and stops clots forming and makes the blood flow easier. Whereas warfarin is an anticoagulant  and turns your blood to water and makes it easier to pump hence all the dire warnings and monthly INR tests to make sure it is within the desired thinness range.


john
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 08 May 2017, 10:17:09 AM
Quote
So now I am on basal injections so that will go to running my body and than any left over from that together with any insulin my pancreas is producing is used to correct my BG. If there isn’t enough left over to combat spikes etc then I might have to go on bolus as well.


Well, not quite JohnThere should not be any "left over". If you are on a correct basal dose you should be able to go without eating all day long and remain level.  If you start to go down and need to prop it up with food then that indicates that your basal dose is too high.  May I suggest you have another look at that link and check out the paragraphs on "Basal testing"
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 08 May 2017, 10:43:29 PM
Hey - she means a fridge full of glue and insulin now!  LOL  (and the insulin goes in the top shelf of the door so if that's where the glue goes - tough, ditto if Mrs John likes to keep eg the butter there.)
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 09 May 2017, 07:23:02 PM
Thank you Patti I had a feeling I hadnt got it quite right.

I am doing some night time testing as I wake up several times a night due to other problems so I have been testing to see what is happening. I go low then high then come down a bit again, I seem to go up sometime between 3.30 and 5am I am just hoping I wake up during that time so I can test.

Unfortunately my appointment with my DSN didnt happen on Monday as she is of sick, hopefully she will be back by Friday. I did talk to a junior DSN about splitting the dose etc but she said I need to wait until Mary comes back.



It is taking me a long time to get back to pre eating levels even on very low carb meals so I think Bolus is coming soon.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 09 May 2017, 07:28:19 PM
You are not wrong Jenny I have had that comment followed by there wont be room for food in there soon. I think she wants a new fridge freezer as she keeps dropping hints about one of those american stile fridge freezers with ice making as one of my sons brought one a couple of months ago. The problem is to fit it in she will lose a cupboard so she is thinking which she wants most, my comment was it was a good idea to get a new one as it gives me more room for insulin once I go onto Bolus as well. ;D
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 09 May 2017, 08:07:06 PM
Quote
my comment was it was a good idea to get a new one as it gives me more room for insulin once I go onto Bolus as well. (http://diabetes-support.org.uk/diabetes_forum/Smileys/default/grin.gif)

LOL LOL!  I keep mine in the butter compartment of the door, along with the butter and the opened tube of tomato puree!
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 09 May 2017, 09:14:24 PM
Our fridge has two shelves apart from the bottom one where we keep the open milk and the currently open bottle of Tescos famous water.   Top one is all me - still got a vial in there (prolly out of date now so needs chucking) two prefilled pens (for emergencies) my Hypokit in its plastic box  and up to three boxes of pump cartridges - the one that only has the last cartridge in it, plus the replacement two boxes on the new prescription I just had filled.  Butter and eggs on the middle one.

If I start making/buying stuff that needs fridging eg a chilled raw chicken and a relatively small premade gateau it's a jigsaw.  If we had an actual party - we'd have to turn the fridge in the Moho on!  In winter of course - wine, beer and mixers go in the big fridge that God made for us all to share, right outside the back door on the slabs!
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 18 May 2017, 01:51:30 PM
HI all, I am still around just had a few very hectic days followed by a few days of some bug so not been in the mood to do anything really.

At the moment I keep my one box of pens on the top shelf of the fridge next to the super glue.

I had a good chat with my DSN, she is a fully qualified DSN, and I am now gently increasing my insulin as required by 2 units every 4 days. In addition I have split the dose to twice a day I was getting bad liver dumps or something during the night, I only started on the split dose yesterday but for the first time since I started on the insulin I went through the night without a liver dump, or at least one that woke me up.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 18 May 2017, 07:39:23 PM
John

Sorry you've not been well and hope you are feeling better.
Quote
In addition I have split the dose to twice a day I was getting bad liver dumps or something during the night, I only started on the split dose yesterday but for the first time since I started on the insulin I went through the night without a liver dump, or at least one that woke me up.

Please can you explain what you mean by "bad liver dumps"?  In the context I understand them I have no idea why they should wake you.   
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 18 May 2017, 10:34:08 PM
HI Patti

It is probably the wrong term or in the wrong context. What I mean is that I wake up very hot and sweating if I immediately measure my BG it might be around 6.0 at that time and then check it again 15 minutes later and it can be as high as 11.0. I was told many years ago that this was caused by my liver dumping some of its sugar store as I had gone very low while sleeping.

I dont know if this is correct but it seems like a reasonable description to me, it is the same feeling I get as when I am low and raise my BG quickly with glucose tablets etc or after a big meal.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 18 May 2017, 10:58:18 PM
John

Quote
It is probably the wrong term or in the wrong context. What I mean is that I wake up very hot and sweating if I immediately measure my BG it might be around 6.0 at that time and then check it again 15 minutes later and it can be as high as 11.0. I was told many years ago that this was caused by my liver dumping some of its sugar store as I had gone very low while sleeping.

What that would say to me is that you are suffering hypos whilst you sleep and only waking to the subsequent liver dump, rather than having unexplained liver dumps.  Therefore I would be cautious about raising insulin at the rate of 2u if part of that 2u is overnight.  On the contrary you may need to reduce it over that time to avoid the initial hypo which is causing the subsequent liver dump, as opposed to raising it to counteract a completely spontaneous and unexplained liver dump.

OR a completely different explanation might be that your body, having got used to higher levels thinks it's hypo at a level of 6 and reacts accordingly.  In other words a false hypo.  In either case I would be extremely reluctant to raise overnight basal until you know what's what.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 19 May 2017, 08:54:26 AM
HI Patti

Yes it is probably caused by hypos at what level they start I dont know yet but I will find out.

I have spilt my dose so instead of 10u at night I am taking only 5u which at the moment seems to be working but it is early days. I am now taking a morning dose as well which with the raise of 2u is now 7u in total which also seems to be working.

I am currently going to bed on about 8bg and waking up in the morning at about the same level, same during the day my BG is reducing after meals a lot quicker than it did when I was on the single dose.

It is early days still so I am keeping an eye on what is going on, some of it is down to a change in diet but some is definitely down to the insulin.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 19 May 2017, 03:26:34 PM
On a split basal - Levemir - I landed up on (approx.) 15u in the morning and 5u at night - I always imagine I needed less at night - but since getting the pump have seen that it was not the case.  However - there was enough of the 15u left over and still working through the late evening (say 10pm - 1am) with the evening dose of 5u at 9.30pm ish added on - to do the job.  Fascinating !

As long as the nurse isn't saying increase both doses, that's what Patti meant - cos it wasn't apparent you were already not doing that.  You ain't - so  that's OK - Phew !  LOL
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 19 May 2017, 08:12:11 PM
Quote
It is early days still so I am keeping an eye on what is going on, some of it is down to a change in diet but some is definitely down to the insulin.

You do sound like you hope that once it is sorted that's it, it's sorted.  I hate to burst your bubble, but insulin doses are never sorted and fixed rigidly.  You will get it right and it may stay right for maybe a couple of months and then something will happen and you may not ever know what that something is, but you will have to tweak and change it again.  So it's not like "I am keeping an eye on it now because it is early days"  you will always and forever have to keep an eye on it.

I'm just going through a period now where I know it's not right, but I am unsure as to where to change it.  Or if it's even  worth it right now as my circumstances are about to change radically and I might as well bumble along and fix it then.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 23 May 2017, 10:47:05 AM
On a split basal - Levemir - I landed up on (approx.) 15u in the morning and 5u at night - I always imagine I needed less at night - but since getting the pump have seen that it was not the case.  However - there was enough of the 15u left over and still working through the late evening (say 10pm - 1am) with the evening dose of 5u at 9.30pm ish added on - to do the job.  Fascinating !

As long as the nurse isn't saying increase both doses, that's what Patti meant - cos it wasn't apparent you were already not doing that.  You ain't - so  that's OK - Phew !  LOL

The nurse has left it to me to sort out the dose but she is on the end of the phone if I need her.
Just upped my morning dose to 9 units things are going good.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 23 May 2017, 11:16:29 AM
Glad to hear things are going well. I'd be interested in seeing your numbers now. Just one or two days.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 23 May 2017, 11:18:42 AM
Quote
It is early days still so I am keeping an eye on what is going on, some of it is down to a change in diet but some is definitely down to the insulin.

You do sound like you hope that once it is sorted that's it, it's sorted.  I hate to burst your bubble, but insulin doses are never sorted and fixed rigidly.  You will get it right and it may stay right for maybe a couple of months and then something will happen and you may not ever know what that something is, but you will have to tweak and change it again.  So it's not like "I am keeping an eye on it now because it is early days"  you will always and forever have to keep an eye on it.

I'm just going through a period now where I know it's not right, but I am unsure as to where to change it.  Or if it's even  worth it right now as my circumstances are about to change radically and I might as well bumble along and fix it then.


I realise I will be juggling numbers for the rest of my life but as I like my life it is something I am happy to do.


My attitude to my health is somewhat different to others while I am aware of the long term I am working for the short term as well, it is a bit like the old saying look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves. My body has been trying to kill itself in various ways for decades and there are a number of things I have to monitor and adjust on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. I know i have various things coming up over the next 6 months which will probable change a lot of things but I will worry about them nearer the time. For the moment I have set myself a target of getting most if not all of my pre meal readings below 7 and I am getting there.


Over the previous 6 months my average BG has been in the region of 14 with only one reading below 10 and that was 9.9 which made me feel a lot better at the time. Over the last 7 days my average BG is 9.8 with a number of tests under 7 so things are changing which is good and making me feel better in more ways than one.


I have just upped my morning dose to 9 units so we will see how that goes once I get it down to a more acceptable level I will start testing as per the page you mentioned before which seems like a very good way to do it.


I am still having spikes after meals so I am updating my carbs spread sheet so that it is more accurate anticipating that I will be going on bolus sooner or later.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 23 May 2017, 11:27:48 AM
Basal insulin means 'base' get the base right and then you can work on the meals. Until you get into the more normal range before meals it is hard to be sure your after meal results are accurate.

If you want to look at post meal results the important bit is how much you went up rather than the number. I mean if you got from 9 to 13 say that isn't that big a raise but the numbers don't look good because you started high. On the other hand if that 9 went up to say 15-18 then you'd want to look at not eating that (or less of it) and/or adding a fast acting insulin to help with that.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 23 May 2017, 11:28:06 AM
Glad to hear things are going well. I'd be interested in seeing your numbers now. Just one or two days.


Thank you if this works readings for the last 7 days in a pretty graph below  :D


The two very low ones are just my way of recording a change in meds.


(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i237/jptaylor_photos/graph_zpsrzkew6yn.png)
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 23 May 2017, 11:50:05 AM
Glad to see they get more and more within range like you said. Plus the peaks aren't anywhere near as high. All looking great. I'm sure you are happy.
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: sedge on 23 May 2017, 02:36:23 PM
I don't like how high the X Axis goes up to!  LOL - I blooming well hope not. 

I can't get a reading of 34 on my meter, it just says HI - have always thought it's very nice to be so friendly, but surely they all ought to say EEK instead ?
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 23 May 2017, 02:40:52 PM
This one is over the last month and the high on it is only 29.2 and this was an improvement on some I had had before, but I have hidden those months away  :rofl:


(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i237/jptaylor_photos/graph%202_zpsl5b6qjbh.png)
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Pattidevans on 23 May 2017, 05:02:41 PM
Looks like your highest peak is just under 18, but the numbers definitely look like they are improving!
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: John on 23 May 2017, 06:15:35 PM
Hi Patti

Yes the highest peak was 17.2 after dinner a rise of 6 from before dinner. All the peaks come after meals but the rise is not as bad as before.

A question what do you do with used insulin pens just chuck them in the bin or return them to the chemist or something else?
Title: Re: A new adventure
Post by: Liam on 23 May 2017, 06:37:31 PM
Just bin them when done with them.