Diabetes Support Forum

Living with diabetes => Health, fitness and sport => Topic started by: TonyH on 16 January 2014, 10:57:32 AM

Title: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: TonyH on 16 January 2014, 10:57:32 AM
Background
Diagnosed as Type II diabetic 05/10/2012
Age 66 15-Feb-1947
Weight 88.1Kg
Height 165cm
BMI 32

Medication
Metformin
Rampril
Fenofibrate
Pamsvax XL 400
Simvastatin

12 years ago, I ran five marathons in nine mouths however never reached the sub 4 hours  Half marathons were part of my training runs...

Been using the Polar FT60 since 23-May-2013 then progressed to a RCX5 system 14-June-2013, around this time invested into a GT Avalanche 3 Mountain bike to cross train.

After 11 years of sedimentary living VO2mxz at my start, time 25 ;-( I needed a good kick up the Bum and sort my old body out.


Current Status
Weight 81Kg (need to get down to 68K)
BMI 29
VO2Max 36
Using Polar Bike training program level 8/20
Attend local Gym five days per week doing treadmill jogging 70 minutes, hill and speed work together with upper-body weight /strength  workouts.
I am finding all the training very hard which in turn is effecting my motivation!

Now my question at last!
I need to review my current training routine as I am now finding the workouts are hard. With my medical situation age and the drugs that I am taking, should my workload be adjusted to take into account. E.g. part of my medication is for high blood pressure would the effects results on a Heart Rate Monitor?   


Looking forward to any replies of others users who are on medication and are trying to lose weight along with wanting gain a level of fitness using the Polar systems.
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: nytquill17 on 16 January 2014, 12:39:10 PM
The technical training info is a bit beyond me. You may want to check out Runsweet, which is a site entirely oriented around diabetes and sport/training. But I can still throw out a few ideas.

Might be the statins (and from what I've heard fibrates are not much better). They can cause muscle pain and in fact muscle wasteage/weakness in some people, if that's you it may be making your workouts harder to get through. You may not actually need it either - the official goal for cholesterol for diabetics is a lot lower than it actually needs to be for good health outcomes. There is a big push to get all diabetics on statins no matter what, and your doctor may even get a financial kickback for having your cholesterol below a certain level (if you are in the UK). Worth doing a little side research and see what opinion you come to about it. There's tons of threads on statins, admittedly mostly anti-statin, on this forum for a start, some with links to research.

May also be your actual blood glucose - do you monitor it regularly? With all that training you really need to. You're not on any medication that can cause low blood sugar but you still do need to know what's going on before, during, and after you train! For example training with a BG over 14 or so can be dangerous as it can cause it to go even higher temporarily. Also training with a high BG anyway is bound to be rough as you will feel more fatigued and lacking in energy right from the start. If your medical team is not pro self-monitoring (sadly, many aren't even though it's the best way that exists to manage diabetes) there's info on this forum about how to either argue your position with them or if that fails, how to get hold of an inexpensive monitoring device on your own and test strips to use with it. It's really, really worth doing.

I can't speak to the BP meds right off the top of my head but it does seem possible that they might have an effect as well. The only real problem I'm aware of from the -prils is some people get a tickling cough.
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Pattidevans on 16 January 2014, 11:01:05 PM
Hi Tony and welcome to the forum.
Quote
12 years ago, I ran five marathons in nine mouths however never reached the sub 4 hours  Half marathons were part of my training runs...
With due respect, 12 years ago you were 54 and not diabetic.  Since then, at your own admission you've been living a sedentary life.
Quote
I need to review my current training routine as I am now finding the workouts are hard. With my medical situation age and the drugs that I am taking, should my workload be adjusted to take into account. E.g. part of my medication is for high blood pressure would the effects results on a Heart Rate Monitor?   
FWIW that level of work out isn't necessary to control diabetes, a brisk walk several times a week is sufficient, but obviously you feel that you need to get fit and would prefer to do it in a gym.

Like Nytquill I have no idea what all the technical stuff refers to (the models of the machines you are using?), but as you are attending a gym I would suggest that if it is a good one there will be a fully trained and qualified person there who should be able to answer your questions and should have a good working knowledge of BP and diabetes too.  If there isn't then perhaps a move to another gym might be advisable?  I should think that with your medical situation and age it's rather dangerous to do the high level of training you are attempting without some supervision and I'd imagine that they would suggest you start slower and work up to a level which is comfortable for you.

How are your BGs?  Do you have a monitor to test them?  Because frankly if your BGs are high your body will not be in a fit state to do the high level of exercise you are doing.  If mine go into double figures I find it makes me exceedingly lethargic and I'd find doing concentrated exercise at those levels much much more difficult than I would if I were in the "normal" range.




Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Alan on 17 January 2014, 12:26:55 AM
I can't really comment on the training situation, but related to the diabetes information about your control in terms of HbA1c and blood glucose numbers would help. Also, what dietary regimen do you follow?
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Colette1 on 28 January 2014, 11:03:04 AM
Tony, like you (I should imagine) I am going to have a look at Runsweet.  Exercise in a gym is not something to be taken lightly.  I have been diagnosed for 6 years - a lot of that time I have been running, swimming and now (because it's not easy to run outside) I'm back at the gym.  Well, last night I did my usual running machine, bike, rowing machine.  Except when I got to the bike and the rowing machine I lost my senses and did quite a number of very fast cycles.  Added to that mistake I didn't drink water, and I hadn't really eaten to cover exercise when I got home I was 10.4!!  Hope you do what I didn't do (and shame on me not being exactly a novice to Type 2) and take your numbers before, during and after exercise.  I am going to have a session with a trainer on Thursday so that I fully understand what I'm doing. 

Leaving my idiocy out, it looks like you are committed to exercise and understand the efficacy of appropriate exercise.  It really does help when done properly.
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Colette1 on 28 January 2014, 11:06:12 AM
Runsweet.  Everything seems to be for Type 1's.  Aw well, back to the drawing board.
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Welshsy on 28 January 2014, 07:14:18 PM
I see a personal trainer twice a week, best decision I ever made and money well spent!
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: DarwinG on 20 May 2017, 12:26:43 PM
I see a personal trainer twice a week, best decision I ever made and money well spent!

What sore of exercise are you doing? Cardio or weights?
Title: Re: How Hard Should I Train?
Post by: Pattidevans on 21 May 2017, 02:27:42 PM
DarwinG

This thread is 3 years old.  I doubt you will get a response.