Author Topic: Cooking oil list  (Read 2770 times)

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Offline TerryJ

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Cooking oil list
« on: 11 May 2012, 10:03:22 AM »
I got to wondering which would be the best fat/oil for high temperature cooking and found this list on wikipedia. If you click on the markers at the top of the smoke point column, you can sort them into descending order.

Surprisingly, virgin coconut oil is quite low down on the list. Ghee is probably the best value fat with a high smoke point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point

Type 2 since 1999. Current meds Gliclazide
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Offline Pattidevans

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #1 on: 11 May 2012, 10:24:13 AM »
Interesting, some of those oils I've never heard of - or at least I'm sure they're not available in the local Tesco (that's not necessarily a dig at Tesco, I have been to other Tescos that have a much larger range of goods than our local one!).  Can you tell me why a high smoke point is desirable Terry?  I do very very little frying, but a fair bit of roasting.
Patti


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Offline Liam

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #2 on: 11 May 2012, 11:16:19 AM »
Only time I need a high smoking point oil is for stir frying. I use rice bran oil myself, mostly because it is cheap. High smoking point just means you can get the oil hotter before it starts to burn.
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Offline Avocado

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #3 on: 11 May 2012, 12:04:06 PM »
I use virgin organic coconut oil for frying - it's high in good fats too. I don't do deep frying, just regular frying and stir frying.
Anne

Atypical Type 2, thin, not insulin resistant, diagnosed March 2007. Very low carb (30 - 50g per day) Paleo diet and exercise - Prandin (Repaglinide) 0.5mg. Aortic Valve Replacement Jan 2014, Osteoporosis, Small airways disease, probable coeliac - Strontium Ranelate 2g/d, Omacor 2g/d, vitamin K2 300mcg/d, Aviticol (vit D3) 20,000 IU every week, Qvar 100 2/day.

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Offline TerryJ

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #4 on: 11 May 2012, 12:44:17 PM »
why a high smoke point is desirable

The oil is less likely to break down which makes it less healthy for you.

"polyunsaturated oils like soya, canola, sunflower, and corn oil degrade easily to toxic compounds when heated"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_oil
Type 2 since 1999. Current meds Gliclazide
HbA1c Feb10 10.9, May10 7.7, Oct10 6.6, Oct11 6.7, Dec12 6.4, Nov13 6.9

Offline lozzark

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #5 on: 11 May 2012, 01:25:23 PM »
Butter Ghee, is pretty good.  I prefer refined coconut oil because it is mainly saturated fat.  I see though they don't list beef tallow 420F (beef dripping).  Beef dripping used to be the favoured deep-frying oil of fish & chip shops, until they switched to "vegetable oil" (mainly corn oil) because of it is supposedly heart healthier and you can sell to vegetarians.  These days they use refined palm oil (highly saturated), although the proprietors generally buy it as solid vegetable oil . Chinese cooks use peanut (ground nut oil) by choice.  In general refined oils tend to have a higher smoke point.

High temperature frying is thought to produce, free radicals, damaged fats & oxidised cholesterol, and although it is thought to be "healthy", I can't see how it can be.  If you add water it keeps the temperature down.  I used to stir-fry, but abandoned the idea.  Now I cook at much lower temperatures in a flat bottomed sautee pan and it tastes just as good.  Vegetables do not need anything higher than boiling water/steam.  Oil/fats absorb flavours at ambient temperature: the high temperature is irrelevant.  So if you put spices or herbs in the oils/fats to start with and sautee gently, the flavours will still permeate anything that is cooked in them. 
The Healthy Stir-Fry Cooking Method uses no oil at all!!
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Offline lozzark

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #6 on: 11 May 2012, 01:35:21 PM »
why a high smoke point is desirable

The oil is less likely to break down which makes it less healthy for you.

"polyunsaturated oils like soya, canola, sunflower, and corn oil degrade easily to toxic compounds when heated"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_oil
I think they must be talking about the unrefined varieties.  Refining involves reducing the polyunsaturated content and adding man-made antioxidants. Both aprocesses help to resist oil break-down during high temperature cooking.
T2 Dx 2000 Metformin Gliclazide HbA1c 53 BP 129/79 Cholesterol 5.4, HDL 1.16, LDL 2.9.

Offline Alan

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #7 on: 13 May 2012, 12:12:31 AM »
I got to wondering which would be the best fat/oil for high temperature cooking and found this list on wikipedia. If you click on the markers at the top of the smoke point column, you can sort them into descending order.

Surprisingly, virgin coconut oil is quite low down on the list. Ghee is probably the best value fat with a high smoke point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point

I keep it simple. I use peanut oil for high-temp deep frying; I wasn't aware there was an enormous difference between processed (450) and unprocessed (320), but as I haven't smoked the house out I presume mine is processed. I also use spray canola for some cooking, but I mainly use it on the BBQ and for seasoning cast-iron pans.

I use EVOO for almost everyrthing else, from salad oil to low-temp frying. I know ordinary olive oil would do for that, but I'm too lazy to buy separate types. I keep some special oils for flavourings, such as avocado oil and sesame oil. Although Avocado oil has an impressive smoke point it is far too expensive for general use.
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
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Offline Alan

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #8 on: 13 May 2012, 12:13:43 AM »
why a high smoke point is desirable

The oil is less likely to break down which makes it less healthy for you.

"polyunsaturated oils like soya, canola, sunflower, and corn oil degrade easily to toxic compounds when heated"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_oil
I think they must be talking about the unrefined varieties.  Refining involves reducing the polyunsaturated content and adding man-made antioxidants. Both aprocesses help to resist oil break-down during high temperature cooking.

I was told many years ago that over-heating vegetable oils could transform them to trans-fats, but I have never seen science to support that. However, I try not to do it.
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey (latest: Slow Cooked Beef Brisket)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Surviving Long-haul Flights in Cattle Class)

Offline lozzark

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Re: Cooking oil list
« Reply #9 on: 14 May 2012, 05:47:49 PM »
why a high smoke point is desirable

The oil is less likely to break down which makes it less healthy for you.

"polyunsaturated oils like soya, canola, sunflower, and corn oil degrade easily to toxic compounds when heated"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_oil
I think they must be talking about the unrefined varieties.  Refining involves reducing the polyunsaturated content and adding man-made antioxidants. Both aprocesses help to resist oil break-down during high temperature cooking.

I was told many years ago that over-heating vegetable oils could transform them to trans-fats, but I have never seen science to support that. However, I try not to do it.
Overheating oils will definitely oxidise & degrade them.  I believe that trans fats (excluding those created by cows) can only be produced during high temperature industrial processing, but it is a moot point because oxidised oils are bad enough! 
T2 Dx 2000 Metformin Gliclazide HbA1c 53 BP 129/79 Cholesterol 5.4, HDL 1.16, LDL 2.9.