Diabetes Support Forum

News. views, research and opinions => Off topic => Topic started by: GrammaBear on 14 June 2016, 05:31:36 PM

Title: Whose problem is it??
Post by: GrammaBear on 14 June 2016, 05:31:36 PM
Whose problem is it when I tell a doctor - "I am severely hearing impaired, I need to see your face so I can lip read what you are saying to me."  The Doctor acknowledges that statement and then goes about business as usual by turning his back while he is speaking to me?  I own my hearing impairment by wearing a hearing aid and by telling the person that I can't hear well.  Why is it that so many doctors 'forget' what they were told 5 minutes prior?
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: nytquill17 on 14 June 2016, 06:15:45 PM
It's not an unreasonable thing to ask but odds are they just aren't thinking about it, so it does become up to you to make them think about it each time they forget, if you want to be sure to get all the information they're discussing. I doubt there is any disrespect meant; it's just not something hearing people are used to considering, sadly.

Remind them as soon as they turn around - and do it every time until they get in the habit. If you're kind but firm about it ("I'm sorry, I know it's a change in habits, but I really cannot understand you if I can't see your face. Please turn around." "I'm sorry, I didn't catch that - can you repeat everything you said while not facing me? As I mentioned, I can't understand you if I can't see your face, and I don't want to miss anything important." ) they should get the point with no harm done. And if they DO get annoyed or frustrated, well, THAT is definitely NOT your problem!
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: GrammaBear on 14 June 2016, 06:39:32 PM
Nytquill - my husband said much the same thing to me about this ongoing issue I have.  The only problem that I have with your suggestion is that once the doctor/nurse turns around I often cannot tell whether or not they are speaking or just checking the chart for information.  I'm sure that I often miss whatever it is they were saying when their back is turned because I don't know if they are talking or not.   ???
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: Venomous on 14 June 2016, 07:20:13 PM
I'm sure it would drive me potty and I'd get exasperated with it. I'm so sorry GrammaBear.
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: Pattidevans on 15 June 2016, 01:58:14 PM
How horrible for you Kathy.  Perhaps when they turn and you don't know if they are speaking, you could just say "I'm sorry but I have no idea if you are speaking or not"
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: himtoo on 16 June 2016, 07:27:03 AM
I would echo Patti's thoughts -- a polite "excuse me , are you speaking to me as I cant hear you"
should do the trick if repeated a couple of times during an appt -- you are the patient and they are there to serve you !!
Title: Re: Whose problem is it??
Post by: GrammaBear on 16 June 2016, 03:22:41 PM
Thanks All for the suggestions.  Sometimes when one is right in the middle of a situation, possible solutions are not so visible.  I've had this problem with doctors for such a long time that I've given up trying to find a solution.  I will try your suggestions at my next GP visit and see how things go.  Hearing impairment is an invisible problem until someone speaks to the person.